Google Doodle celebrates 50 years of LGBTQ pride

first_img Online Tech Industry Our favorite Google Doodles through the years Share your voice Tags Google Doodle Google Comments 99+ 49 Photos Google’s Pride Doodle depicts the growing size of the Pride celebration over the past half century. Google Fifty years ago this month, New York police launched an early morning raid on a small Greenwich Village bar popular with members of the gay community, sparking the Stonewall riots and ushering in the modern battle for LGBT rights in the US.To celebrate the 50 years of Pride celebrations that followed, Google published a Doodle sideshow on Tuesday that offers a taste of Pride parades from each of the five decades. Google’s Doodlers wanted the Doodle to underscore how the Pride parade has grown in size and momentum over the past half century, empowering a bright and vibrant community along the way.Over the years, Google has taken a high-profile stance in support of gay rights. In 2008, the company announced its opposition to Proposition 8, an anti-gay marriage measure that California voters ultimately approved. To mark June as Gay and Lesbian Pride month, Google has traditionally added a rainbow to the right side of the search bar when users search for “gay,” “lesbian,” “transgender,” or related terms. This year’s return on those search terms is a graphic depicting Pride celebrations around the world.For this year’s Doodle, Doodler Nate Swinehart said he decided to use strips of cut paper to depict the people and the setting. By adding multiple layers of paper, which by its nature is flat, the Doodle grows to reflect the community’s expansion. Color, of course, is a key symbol of Pride.google-doodle-2009-june-4-pride-2019Color is a key symbol of Pride. Google “While everything begins with shades of grey, we first see the rainbow through a community space,” Swinehart explains. “Color then begins to spread, first in individual people, then to the city around them, until it finally overtakes the entire composition.”I also wanted the progression of color to be meaningful, beginning with the initial pink triangle that was reclaimed by the community as a symbol of liberation. From there, we go backwards through the rainbow from purple to red, until we see all the colors come together harmoniously in the final image.”Swinehart writes that, as a member of the LGBTQ community, this Doodle was a very personal project for him, especially because he’s well acquainted with the struggle to feel included and accepted.”Before I joined Google in 2014, I remember opening up the Google homepage to see a Doodle celebrating the Winter Olympics, depicting the colors of the Pride flag. I was completely blown away,” Swinehart writes. “Looking at the front page of Google, I was filled with hope and a feeling of belonging. “That moment was a large part of why I wanted to become a Doodler. I recognized the opportunity we have to make a positive impact on the world, and to help make people feel seen, heard, and valued.”last_img read more

Study shows slime molds have spatial memory

first_img PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Phys.org)—Biology researchers from the University of Sydney, working with colleagues from Paul Sabatier Université in Toulouse have found that the brainless slime mold Physarum polycephalum, is able to use its slime trail as a memory device. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describe how they used a baited trap to test the molds’ ability to navigate around an obstacle both when able to use its trail as a guide, and when its trail was disguised, to uncover how the mold uses the trail as a memory device. The research found that that a single-celled organism with no brain uses an external spatial memory to navigate through a complex environment. Credit: Tanya Latty Explore further Citation: Study shows slime molds have spatial memory (2012, October 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-slime-molds-spatial-memory.html Play Plasmodium solving U-shaped trap problem on substrate of blank agar. Credit: PNAS. The key to solving the problem lies in how the mold moves around and in the makeup of the slime trail it leaves behind. P. polycephalum has several different parts, or areas that make up its body, each of which respond independently to its environment. The different parts expand and contract, pulsating at a certain rate depending on what is being experienced. Heat, food or light cause changes in the pulsation rate which differ from the rate of other parts of the molds’ body. These differences in pulsation rates are what cause the mold to move. As the mold moves, a layer of slime is deposited beneath its body to allow for sliding across surface material. Chemicals in the slime also cause changes in the pulsation rate, which accounts for how they can avoid treading on it.Suspecting that the mold was somehow using its slime trail as a memory device, the team ran two experiments involving traps. The first involved placing a mold in trap with a Y shaped obstacle with food placed at each end of the branch. When a slime mat was placed in the path between the mold and the food source, 39 out of 40 test slime went all the other way around to get at it.In the second experiment, the molds were placed in a trap where a U shaped obstacle was placed between the mold and a food source. As the molds made their way to the food, they were timed to see how long it took them to get around the obstacle. Two types of trials were run, the first was where the molds were allowed to move on a normal surface. In the second, the surface was covered with slime similar to that produced by the mold, preventing the mold from using it as a memory device. When the molds were allowed to use their trails, 96 percent of them reached the food within 120 hours. That number shrank to just 33 percent when left to navigate without use of their trail.These results indicate that P. polycephalum uses its slime trail as a memory device, the first example of that ability in an organism with no brain. Slime mold prefers sleeping pillscenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences P. polycephalum is a simple creature, made up of just one cell. It has no brain, nor neural system, yet is able to move about in its environment without retracing its steps. How it has been able to accomplish this feat has remained a mystery, until now. © 2012 Phys.org More information: Slime mold uses an externalized spatial “memory” to navigate in complex environments, PNAS, Published online before print October 8, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1215037109AbstractSpatial memory enhances an organism’s navigational ability. Memory typically resides within the brain, but what if an organism has no brain? We show that the brainless slime mold Physarum polycephalum constructs a form of spatial memory by avoiding areas it has previously explored. This mechanism allows the slime mold to solve the U-shaped trap problem—a classic test of autonomous navigational ability commonly used in robotics—requiring the slime mold to reach a chemoattractive goal behind a U-shaped barrier. Drawn into the trap, the organism must rely on other methods than gradient-following to escape and reach the goal. Our data show that spatial memory enhances the organism’s ability to navigate in complex environments. We provide a unique demonstration of a spatial memory system in a nonneuronal organism, supporting the theory that an externalized spatial memory may be the functional precursor to the internal memory of higher organisms.Press release This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more