Good News Gardens begins its second year of praying, planting…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Good News Gardens begins its second year of praying, planting and proclaiming By Heather Beasley DoylePosted Mar 3, 2021 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Food and Faith Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Beekeeping at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Reston, Virginia. Photo courtesy of Brian Sellers-Petersen[Episcopal News Service] When Heather Zimmerman visited St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 2019, she spotted vegetable boxes “wedged in between some cemetery stones,” she recently told Episcopal News Service. In them, the church’s property manager, Roberto Morales, was “gleefully growing tomatoes,” said Zimmerman, yet he bemoaned the churchyard’s lack of sun.The observation prompted Zimmerman, who is the executive director of Awbury Arboretum, to invite the Rev. David Morris, St. Luke’s rector, and Morales to expand the church’s kitchen garden into one 35-square-foot plot and another half its size at Awbury Arboretum’s 16-acre community garden, which is less than two miles from the church. The harvested produce would go to the church’s food pantry and meal programs, which fed 9,000 people at the church in Philadelphia’s Germantown neighborhood in 2019.A group of gardeners from St. Luke’s in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. From left to right, the Rev. David Morris, Donna Drake, Roberto Morales and Jimmie Reed. Photo: Donna DrakeSt. Luke’s first growing season at the arboretum was last year. Volunteers donned masks and stood far apart as they grew squash, potatoes, onions and other vegetables. “Incorporating another area like the one at Awbury, we realized we needed some guidance,” Morris said. So when they heard about The Episcopal Church’s Good News Gardens movement, they joined.Good News Gardens, an initiative of the church’s Evangelism and Creation Care offices, launched last spring. It blends faith and agriculture and asks participants to plant, pray and proclaim, with the hope of feeding those in need while stewarding land and fostering community. Good News Gardens has gained enough traction that the church recently hired its first coordinator/agrarian evangelist to support a widening vision of how Episcopalians can connect and care for each other while tending the earth.Produce grown at the Chapel of the Good Shepherd’s Good News Garden in Ridgeway, North Carolina. Photo: Nancy M. JohnsonThe Good News Gardens project began early in the pandemic, as the presiding bishop’s staff thought about how to respond to a crisis that nixed indoor meetings and gatherings. Jerusalem Greer, staff officer for evangelism, felt powerless, she said, to help those affected, and she worried about the food system’s resilience as the coronavirus spread.Greer planted extra crops in her home garden in Arkansas, in the spirit of victory gardens, which she’d learned about as a college history major. The gardens became popular in England amid the country’s World War I food shortage. During World War II, the U.S. Department of Agriculture encouraged Americans to grow vegetables to prop up the food system, and “to make people feel like they were contributing,” said Greer. “And to give them something to do.”St. Fiacre watching over Jerusalem Greer’s garden in Arkansas. Greer is The Episcopal Church’s staff officer for evangelism and the creator of the Good News Gardens program. Photo courtesy of Jerusalem GreerThe moment felt ripe for a similar Episcopal movement, so Greer reached out to agrarian ministers, including the Rev. Nurya Love Parish of Plainsong Farm, who was launching a similar initiative in partnership with the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan. With positive feedback, the offices of Evangelism and Creation Care launched Good News Gardens. Participants grow more vegetables, fruits or herbs than they need so they can share the extra with friends or donate it to a local feeding program. Would-be gardeners are invited to plant for the first time, and all are asked to pray daily for creation and share stories of their gardens via social media and personal connections.Greer, along with Associate for Creation Care and Justice Phoebe Chatfield, created the Agrarian Ministries Facebook group last April to support Good News Gardens; the page quickly became home to a loose network of Episcopalians engaged in gardening and agriculture at a time when quarantined Americans were gardening en masse, triggering a run on seeds and chicks. Food insecurity was also growing; 50 million Americans — up from 35 million Americans in 2019 — experienced food insecurity last year.The Agrarian Ministries page steadily attracted members; today, more than 1,200 people share pictures, stories, articles and advice. Some participants garden from home, others cultivate church land and some are farmers. A few dioceses developed the program (Greer describes it as “very open-source”) with local structure, support and social media channels. As of mid-February, more than 240 people or groups had signed up for Good News Gardens 2021.“Last year was kind of like our experiment,” Greer said. “One of the challenges was how fast it grew, to the extent that we brought Brian (Sellers-Petersen) on this year because of how much passion and excitement there is around this work, and the possibilities of what this work could be.”Beekeeping at St. Mark’s Cathedral, Seattle, Washington. Photo courtesy of Brian Sellers-PetersenBrian Sellers-Petersen, the coordinator/agrarian evangelist, said that an expanded social media strategy is in the works and that his main hope for the movement’s second season is for people “to see ‘gardens’ as an inclusive word,” meaning all aspects of the food supply chain. Beekeeping, gardening for butterflies, raising chickens, growing herbs, composting and gleaning leftover food are all part of the movement. In light of last year’s seed run, he also hopes to create a Good News Gardens seed bank “so that we can share seeds between ourselves.”Last year, seeing how other members of Good News Gardens wove gardening with faith informed St. Luke’s six regular gardeners in Philadelphia. In preparation for his church’s second year at Awbury Arboretum, Morris attended Good News Gardens’ first 2021 webinar in early February. “It was really helpful,” he said; the event inspired his crew to write a kitchen garden mission statement.Jennifer Blecha and the Rev. Kerri Meyer, farmer-scholar and farmer-priest respectively, also joined Good News Gardens last year. They moved to Hutchinson, Minnesota, from San Francisco, California, to start Good Courage Farm in 2019; their vision is to grow fruit and asparagus while cultivating a faith-based community from their land.Jennifer Blecha (left) and the Rev. Kerri Meyer (right) of Good Courage Farm. Photo courtesy of Kerri MeyerWhen the Agrarian Ministries page went live, “I thought, ‘Awww, that’s cute,’” Meyer said. As membership grew, she realized: “We’re a people. There’s a bunch of us out here.” From a handful of others in the faith-based gardening community, Meyer had earlier “sensed that there was some energy around this,” she said. “Things happened in those ministries, but it was really lonely work.”Being part of Good News Gardens has mitigated that loneliness, and while one of the movement’s goals is to ease food insecurity, its biggest benefit last year, possibly, was boosting morale. “It’s done a good job of removing aloneness,” Greer said.The Rev. Anna Woofenden, transition pastor at Zion Lutheran Church in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, and author of “This Is God’s Table,” is a member of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts Creation Care Leadership Circle. The diocese plans to strengthen its Good News Gardens structure and is collaborating with the Diocese of Massachusetts. Woofenden sees Good News Gardens as transformative not only for participants but for the church as well. When theological reflection or spiritual formation combines with hands-in-the-dirt community work, it changes people, Woofenden said. “It also changes what the church is, or how and who the church is.”In a sense, Good News Gardens is effectively fueling the church’s evolution. Agrarian ministry is a public liturgy as the church works to change its culture, said the Rev. Melanie Mullen, director of reconciliation, justice and creation care. The more that work beyond the pews is considered part of the church, “the more we can do to revitalize the energy behind spreading the Gospel in all these different ways,” she said.As Blecha and Meyer look to their third growing season, they’re sticking with Good News Gardens — and they have ideas. “One of the next keys for Good News Gardens is to bridge the gap between healthy produce and the people who need it most” with food kits similar to HelloFresh or Blue Apron, Blecha said. Churches could help to assemble them. The time needed to cook healthy food creates a barrier, she said; kits minimize that barrier. “We’re not a veggie farm, but if we were, that’s what I’d want to figure out,” she added.However the details play out, Good News Gardens complements Good Courage Farm’s vision. Meyers called the mandate to plant, pray and proclaim a “beautiful distillation” of the Gospel. “You put this seed in the ground and you commit to tending it, but there’s a certain point at which you realize the growth of that seed is not by your power,” she said. “And so sometimes all you can do is pray once you’ve put that seed in the ground.”– Heather Beasley Doyle is a freelance journalist, writer and editor based in Massachusetts. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

The best ways to support veterans in 2017

first_img Kaylin February 6, 2017 at 11:00 am Please enter your name here February 6, 2017 at 4:44 pm Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Reply A nice Apopka Memorial Veteran’s Park built somewhere in the city to honor all of our veterans and to create a place for the veterans to network together to seek the best ways to support the veterans would be a good starting point……. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Personally I think one of the best ways to support veterans in 2017 is to help our older veterans. For instance there is a little known Aid and Attendance pension benefit that helps senior veterans and their spouses pay for costs of care like assisted living, nursing home, home care, etc.The best resource I found for this information is http://www.VeteranAid.org. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Mama Miacenter_img The Anatomy of Fear Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Reply TAGSVeterans Previous articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in reviewNext article6th Annual Old Florida Outdoor Festival returns to Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! 2 COMMENTS You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Department of Veterans Affairs: 20% of veterans serving after 9/11 have PTSDAs the new administration and Congress settle into office, many organizations are working hard to put America’s 21 million veterans at the top of the nation’s “to-do” list.“Veterans share a common thread – regardless of where they served or for how long – they are driven to protect our country and ensure freedom for all citizens,” says DAV (Disabled American Veterans) National Commander Dave Riley. “At the same time, they face unique challenges, from health problems related to their military service to translating their job skills into meaningful employment opportunities. It’s our nation’s duty to support veterans once they return home.”The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reports that 20 percent of veterans who served since 9/11 are estimated to have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twenty veterans take their lives every day, most of whom never seek help from the VA, and many veterans struggle to find employment, often leading to homelessness.To help change the lives of countless veterans and their families, DAV has suggested three priorities for our country’s leaders in 2017:* Ensure veterans have access to quality and timely health care, including effective mental health services. Changes in the health care system for veterans are critical according to leading veterans service organizations like DAV and VFW, as well as bipartisan leaders in Congress. They all agree the best path forward is to create local, high-performing health care networks, led by the VA, which combine the best of VA with the best of community care.* Give needed benefits to the caregivers of veterans. While caregivers for veterans who served after 9/11 receive benefits and resources, caregivers of veterans who served in earlier conflicts, such as World War II, the Korean War and Vietnam, do not receive them. This law must be amended and made inclusive.* Educate employers about the value of hiring veterans, particularly those with disabilities. A recent survey of employers released by DAV, Monster.com and Military.com reveals 30 percent of employers worry about hiring veterans with PTSD. However, the vast majority of employers who have hired veterans with disabilities report it’s been a positive and productive experience.You can support U.S. veterans.You can be a positive voice for veterans and support changes in your communities. Start by speaking up on important veteran issues and write your elected officials in Congress. Volunteer with your local VA hospital or drive veterans to medical appointments. And, if you own a business or are a hiring manager, be sure your organization considers veterans’ unique talents and strengths.America made a promise to care for its veterans, those men and women who sacrificed for everyone’s freedoms. Now the nation’s leaders must live up to that promise. For more information about important veteran issues and how you can help, visit www.dav.org.last_img read more

Learning by giving: How today’s students can become tomorrow’s philanthropists

first_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear First published on theconversastion.comIf someone asked you to picture a philanthropist, chances are a billionaire like Bill Gates or John D. Rockefeller Sr. would come to mind. But not all philanthropists are billionaires, or even millionaires for that matter. People who make modest gifts of time or money can make a big difference in their communities.We are professors who teach and do research about philanthropy, the practice of expressing generosity by giving away money and in some cases time. We see our job as motivating and preparing college and graduate students to become future leaders of nonprofit organizations or donors with good ideas about how to make a difference – starting right now.Teaching about givingOne approach, known as “experiential philanthropy,” teaches about charitable giving through hands-on experiences. Students get real money, typically about US$10,000 per class, to give away to local nonprofits. One of us (David) has determined that these courses are being taught on more than 80 different campuses.Northern Kentucky University pioneered this approach in 1999. Since then, students there have collectively awarded more than $1.5 million to local charities as part of their coursework.A wealthy donor, Geoffrey P. Raynor, is building on that model through the Philanthropy Lab. So far, this national initiative has spread to more than 20 universities, including many attended by the nation’s richest students, such as Princeton and the University of Chicago.These courses are for all students, however. Undergraduates majoring in everything from chemistry to philosophy and business to history enroll. While some of them are or want to become rich, others do not come from wealth or aspire to become upper-class. All of them sign up because they want to learn how to use their money and time to make change on the issues they care most about.Learning by doing can help turn students into philanthropists. Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock.comDoes it work?Giving away money – particularly when it’s not yours – can be fun. But does it actually teach students anything about philanthropy or how to become philanthropists?To find out, one of us (Lindsey) led a study published in Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly that surveyed more than 600 Northern Kentucky University students who had taken an experiential philanthropy course there from 2009 to 2013.The research team found that students were more interested in donating to and volunteering at local nonprofits after taking the course. They were also more likely to know more about issues affecting their community and what nonprofits were doing about them.Our findings suggest that by studying – and actually engaging in – philanthropy, students learn more about what philanthropy is, why they should do it and how they can make a difference.Paying for itWhile the logic behind these programs may be clear, the question of where the money students give away comes from is not because it’s not something covered in a traditional university budget.So far, foundations like the Learning by Giving Foundation, founded by philanthropist Doris Buffett – Warren Buffett’s sister – and the Once Upon a Time Foundation, funded by the same person as the Philanthropy Lab, are a leading source of financial support.Doris Buffett’s Learning by Giving Foundation funds undergraduate courses at colleges and universities across the country that offer for-credit courses that combine the study of theory with the practice of philanthropy.The federal government has also pitched in to support a program called Pay it Forward, which engages college students in hands-on philanthropy, grant-making and volunteer service. However, Congress abolished that funding in 2011. Its courses are being taught today only in Ohio, where local foundations foot the bill, at campuses like Denison University, The Ohio State University-Newark, Central Ohio Technical College and the University of Cincinnati.Cutting these programs means that young people will be less likely to be able to take philanthropy courses in college. This is troubling, because one of us (Jodi) found that after having opportunities to be actively engaged in giving with a group of peers, young people can better understand philanthropy’s impact.That’s because after learning through these hands-on philanthropic experiences, students often want to donate their own money to nonprofits.Many other kinds of courses about philanthropy and nonprofits are taught at U.S. and foreign universities. But experiential philanthropy is different because students gain practical knowledge and skills. Whether a class gives away $200 or $2,000, they become equipped for future leadership in the charitable world.Education is, to a degree, about investing in the potential of students. And philanthropic education gets students to think about their responsibilities to invest in the communities in which they live. It helps them see the power they have to make a difference. Please enter your comment! LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSPhilanthropythe conversation.com Previous articleIn case you missed it: The Apopka news week in reviewNext article“Let’s Talk About It” Episode 12: Solutions for at-risk youth Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name herelast_img read more

Should you send a text or email? Here’s some advice from…

first_img Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSAristotlethe conversation.com Previous articleRep. Val Demings to participate in civil rights pilgrimage this weekendNext articleOn this day: Florida becomes a state Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Anatomy of Fear By Alexis Elder, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Minnesota DuluthEditor’s Note: This article first published on theconversation.comSuppose you want to get in touch with a friend. Once, your options for doing so might have been sparse: pick up the phone or write a letter. But these days, you have to decide: Should you call or text, use Snapchat, or reach out on Twitter, Messenger or Skype?Other considerations, whether it’s an old friend or new acquaintance, or whether you’re asking a favor or checking in, as well as your own conversational tendencies and preferences, could also factor in.As an ethicist specializing in social technologies, such questions interest me. These choices play a significant role in our lives. As anthropologist Stefana Broadbent observes:“… an individual is now held morally responsible for which particular channel he or she employs. … People may be as incensed by the selection of an inappropriate medium for dumping a boyfriend or girlfriend as the fact that they have been dumped.”This fact was reflected in popular media (as when Chris Rock cursed out a woman’s ex for breaking up via Facebook), but it’s also a feature of our daily lives.From asking a partner to pick up dinner on the way home to checking in on a neighbor with health problems, many of us frequently face the question: How should I communicate?Here’s how to think about the questionI use a theoretical framework known as virtue ethics to tackle such issues. Thinking about how communication channels both affect and express our character can help us make appropriate decisions in each circumstance.Aristotle. Line engraving by P. Fidanza after Raphael Sanzio. ]Wellcome Images, a website operated by Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation based in the United Kingdom., CC BYThe core idea behind virtue ethics is that most of us want to cultivate traits (or virtues) that will help us live well. These virtues can be cultivated through repeated practice, but they can also be destroyed in the same way.Aristotelian virtue ethics emphasize that people should try to aim at the right amount of a trait: Too much fear can make it hard to function, but too little will get them injured. What counts as the right amount can vary based on context – warfare and child care may call for very different sorts of reactions. Nevertheless, some general guidelines can help us think about what kind of people we want to be, and how to get there.We want to be generous, not selfish or servile. We want to be brave, not cowardly or rash. We want to be thoughtful, neither too impulsive nor overanalytical. We want to be empathetic, not callous, but not self-sacrificing. We want to be engaged rather than disengaged, but also not enmeshed with our loved ones. In each case, we aim for the virtuous middle by practicing to develop traits we want for ourselves.Reflect on the message and messengerDifferent communication channels can nudge us toward or away from different extremes. Communication channels like Snapchat and phone calls encourage spontaneity because, once delivered, the message disappears. Forms of communication that leave permanent records, like email encourage deliberateness and thoughtfulness.A phone call could encourage spontaneity. uncoolbob, CC BY-NCIn general, public channels like Facebook posts tend to invite others to share the news and pay attention to us, while private messages can foster more individualized empathetic responses. Some formats, like email, allow one to compose a message at leisure, to revise and polish, encouraging many of us to slow down and reflect. Others, like phone and video chat that require real-time response, could help us be more spontaneous.Use of images like memes, selfies and emojis can help us convey and engage emotionally, while textual communication can help emotions. Researcher Sherry Turkle interviewed a family who argued via text message to help keep emotions from overwhelming their ability to give others a fair hearing, and express themselves clearly.Several ethicists have raised concerns that technology, by making things easier, can lead to de-skilling. We could lose certain skills by failing to exercise them. For example, I might lose the ability to listen patiently and empathetically if I always communicate by text, drifting in and out of the conversation as it interests or suits me. But I could also use communication technologies like training wheels: to practice the skills I want to exemplify in my life and repeatedly exercising them until they become second nature and are thus integrated into my character.What helps us be better peopleSo, our choice of communication channel, then, should be guided by thinking about how it can help bring together our aspirations about the person we want to be, keeping in mind our character as it currently is.If I know I tend to lose my temper in emotional conversations, arguing via text or email may help me slow down, reflect and reconsider what the other person is saying. Conversely, if I know I tend to coldly distance myself from others, I might opt to correct that by making a point of calling or video chatting.If I tend to give in to pressure too easily, I might switch to a format like email that lets me consider a request before getting back to someone – not just to get around this tendency, but to practice saying “no.”It’s tempting to try to pin all the blame on a technology. It can also be appealing to think that it will automatically improve our lives. But many technologies have both good and bad effects on us, and wise use will help maximize the good effects and avoid the bad.Researchers who looked at the impact of cellphones on interpersonal relationships, for example, found that cellphone use among close friends and family had real positive and negative results. Cellphone use was implicated in users’ tendency to depend on each other. On one hand, this dependency was associated with increased satisfaction with the relationship.But, on the other hand, cellphone use was also associated with reports of overdependence. The researchers reported some users feeling a sense of “entrapment,” and a sense of “guilt and pressure” to respond, which led to dissatisfaction in relationships.It’s true that it is hard to choose the right communication channel because the issue is quite context dependent. But we can use some of these guidelines to think through our options. And in many cases, we can use technology to help us become the people we want to be.Editor’s note: This piece is part of our series on ethical questions arising from everyday life. We would welcome your suggestions. Please email us at [email protected]last_img read more

All Blacks defeat Ireland in freezing conditions

first_imgSunday Jun 8, 2008 All Blacks defeat Ireland in freezing conditions The All Blacks say Saturday’s 21-11 victory over Ireland in freezing, driving rain was the coldest weather they have ever played in.With a chilly wind whipping through the Westpac Stadium, the conditions were worse than when they played in hail against the British and Irish Lions in Christchurch three years ago, according to All Blacks captain Richie McCaw.“I’ve never really got cold out on the field but after half-time I was shivering,” he said.Ireland captain Brian O’Driscoll was still shaking, even after a hot shower, when he fronted for the post-match press conference nearly an hour after the final whistle.In an even match, the score was tied 11-11 with 20 minutes remaining when All Blacks flyhalf Dan Carter swung the result New Zealand’s way with a penalty and then a telling break that resulted in a try to Ma’a Nonu.Carter’s cut through the Irish line to set up Nonu’s try was “a moment of genius”, according to Ireland coach Michael Bradley as he saw an end to Irish hopes of a historic first win against New Zealand in 103 years.All Blacks coach Graham Henry said that while pleased with the outcome of his new-look side’s first outing, little could be read into the game because of the weather. 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As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel ADVERTISEMENT Trending 6 DAYS AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 5 DAYS AGO The time Waisale Serevi used his iconic hitch-kick to carve up Scotland in 2000 Great Tries 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO The time Waisale Serevi used his iconic hitch-kick to carve up Scotland in 2000 1 WEEK AGO Veainu finishes superb try after octopus style offload from Waisea 2 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH REPLAY: Huge stars on show when All Blacks host Pacific Island XV in 2004 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Hooker produces ridiculous speed to score 60-metre wonder try for Hurricanes View All Big Hits & Dirty Play 1 DAY AGO Awesome new Etzebeth montage will have Springboks fans psyched for Summer Lions tour 5 DAYS AGO Melbourne Rebels do their best to wreck Bryn Gatland 5 DAYS AGO Eye-opening compilation shows why Taulupe Faletau could harm Springboks this Summer 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 1 WEEK AGO AWESOME video shows the very biggest and best tackles of the 2020/21 season View All See It To Believe It 4 DAYS AGO Cheetah racer Habana reveals what was actually going through his mind that day 4 DAYS AGO Lam’s explanation of bizarre situation that caused heated touchline argument 5 DAYS AGO François Steyn’s ridiculous 60-metre drop goal which left commentators in hysterics 5 DAYS AGO Re-live O’Driscoll’s EPIC try-saving tackle in 2003 RWC quarter-final 6 DAYS AGO HUGE controversy sees Borthwick call Pat Lam a liar during heated Prem clash View All Funnies 2 WEEKS AGO Joe Marler elated in special interview as fans return to The Stoop 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: One of the luckiest and most bizarre tries you will EVER see 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Reds players caught out in hilarious celebration blooper vs Chiefs 2 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Faz, Piutau and Burns star in hilarious try fail compilation 4 WEEKS AGO MLR: Giltinis howler sees try overruled despite attempts to celebrate View All Amateur 32 WEEKS AGO Viral video of Scottish club brawl goes down a storm with rugby community 69 WEEKS AGO RUGBYDUMP BLITZ: This Best of the Week round up is sure to entertain you 69 WEEKS AGO RD BLITZ – Disaster, just when it looked so promising… 69 WEEKS AGO That glorious moment that will live on forever, like it or not 69 WEEKS AGO RD Blitz – PROP’S Lionel Messi wizardy creates incredible try View All Player Features 16 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bumping off tacklers and taking high balls, Rob Kearney had an impressive Super Rugby debut 21 WEEKS AGO Brian Moore on money in modern rugby and how it should never be compared to ‘outlier’ football 22 WEEKS AGO Tuisova’s wrecking ball montage will make you grateful you never made it as a pro 28 WEEKS AGO New Zealand rugby pod admit Owen Farrell is world class 29 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Bath prop launches Amazon documentary focused on those from non-traditional backgrounds View All Related Content from the RugbyPass Network ‘What you do today is how you’re going to be remembered’: Spirit of Rugby – Ep 5 In Spirit of Rugby episode 5, Jim Hamilton talks Lions with Matt Dawson, Jeremy Guscott, Rob Kearney, Simon Shaw, Tom Croft and John Bentley. Watch: Reforging the Steelers | Episode 2 | RugbyPass Original Documentary In Episode 2 of Reforging the Steelers, we follow the team through rounds two to four as they try to get their season on track after an opening loss to competition powerhouses Tasman. ‘I’d pent-up frustration, a lot I probably didn’t realise’: Marcus Watson’s emotional Wasps return Set to turn 30 later this month, Marcus Watson had an early birthday present last weekend when he finally made it back into the Wasps XV. Gavin Coombes grabs four tries as Munster easy to victory over Zebre Gavin Coombes scored four tries at Zebre as Munster secured second place in the northern section of the Guinness PRO14 Rainbow Cup. Leinster finish with Rainbow flourish as fans attend RDS for first time in 16 months Retiring duo Scott Fardy and Michael Bent bowed out on a winning note as Leinster finished the Rainbow Cup with a victory over Dragons. Final round of the Gallagher Premiership hit by a second match cancellation The final round of the Premiership lost the Worcester-Gloucester match on Tuesday and now Bristol versus London Irish is off. All Blacks defeat Ireland in freezing conditions | RugbyDump – Rugby News & Videos RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Sitemap Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Sign In Username or Email Password Stay logged in Forgot password Thank you for registering Click here to login Register Register now for RugbyDump commenting & enewsletter. * Required fields. Username * Password * Email * Password Repeat * Please send me news, information and special offers from RugbyDump By clicking register you agree to our Privacy Policylast_img read more

The Ross Skeate Diary – Fate or Coincidence

first_imgTuesday May 11, 2010 The Ross Skeate Diary – Fate or Coincidence Toulon have progressively climbed the ladder in the Top 14 and now find themselves within site of achieving the ultimate goal. Ross Skeate, Toulon lock and regular RD columnist, gives us a philosophical insight as to how the team got to where they are today. On Monday night I spent the majority of the evening watching Jonny Wilkinson receive a Midi Olympique “Player Oscar” for the best player of the month… awarded post humourously… or is that humously? I can’t remember and its probably neither anyway. But basically its awarded after the month that it was intended for.The last one I attended (I use the word loosely because I didnt really have a choice in the matter) was Joe Van Niekerk’s last year. I think mine’s on the way somewhere, probably got lost in the post.Anyhoo, I’m getting a little side tracked here. On attending Jonny’s award I couldnt help but ponder how significant certain decisions and events can significantly steer the course of a player’s career. For better or worse in some cases – in Jonny’s case, there’s not all that much worse.For Jonny the significant turning point which signaled his ascension to the top of the world stage (not to mention a million hearts, although he was a pretty capable player long before) was his famous World Cup winning drop kick. And in so many other careers (rugby and otherwise) there was that moment of success that proved to be the catalyst of the rest of a very long and successful career.Yes, but what I am talking about are the hours of dedication, obstacles and trials that mixed with the right amount of great decision making that led to the breaking, or in Jonny’s case, making of a great career.The decisions that led to that point, where a player is put in the moment and it’s either make or break. Of course the decisions that influence a rugby career, like so many other things, are not entirely the rugby player’s. Ponder if you would for a moment, the amount of decisions of coaches, selector’s and administrator’s that pave the way for a player’s career. Imagine how different a career could be with one team missed, one coach who doesn’t favour the player and the subsequent decisions that the player would then make as a result.Imagine a young Joe Van Niekerk, who burst onto the international senior scene in his early twenties on the back of his freakish athletic ability and then coach Harry Viljoen’s confidence and how different his path could have been had Harry selected another bright star in his place.Here he is nearly a decade later (not even having reached thirty) 50 odd Bok caps to his name and the captain of a Toulon side that has had a great year and find’s itself facing Clermont in the Top 14 semi-final and a European Cup final against the Cardiff Blues.Last year Joe was sitting next to me nudging me awake as the 14th speaker took the mic and even then I had a sense of the grand scheme of decisions and events that led the both of us to that very point in our lives.In my case it was the decision to pose for Playgirl that led to the subsequent string of films and small bit movie parts. No, I’m not talking about that bit! I mean like the size of the appearances! Nothing else…seriously…stop it.Anyway.So while I was sitting there marveling at just how many people had turned out to the event, the absolute bizarreness of the context I found myself in didn’t escape me. Let me just reiterate how amazingly passionate the Toulon supporters are, when I say I have never seen anything like it, I mean it. Not even those dudes at Loftus Versfeld painted blue with rings in their noses hold a candle to the Toulon supporters and hence the packed auditorium with queues of people jostling to try find their way inside.So I continue to marvel! How is it that after growing up running round the field’s of S.A.C.S. Junior school (Percy Montgomery’s Alma Mater) barefoot with my young mates, worrying more about who was invited to whose birthday party .I now find myself watching Jonny throwing his best French around on stage while Felipe Contempomi and Tana Umaga look on?How did this team of such varied individuals make it to the same place in the south of France after playing against each other for so many years before, and how did we find ourselves coming to the business end of a successful competition where we have found the very differences between each other and our varied backgrounds, to be our strength?Is it coincidence or fate that brought us to this point? Is it that the immense amount of decisions and obstacles faced and opportunities taken have been designed in a way that we would all intersect our stories at this point in our lives?I guess those are questions of a far more philosophical nature but no matter what realist/nihilist/fatalist theories you may have; it’s very hard to deny the beauty of this moment.So anyway, as we look ahead to the final stages of the season, both the European Cup and Heineken Cup take on a very French flavour demonstrating just how strong French rugby is this year we buckle down for the week leading up to our semi-final clash I cannot express enough just how proud of what we’ve done as a team, and what I have achieved personally since I have joined the club.When I arrived just short of two years ago, we were facing relegation at the bottom of the Top 14 table, since then we have experienced a gradual and successful climb to where we are now.Finishing that season with a great run of wins towards the end of the season leaving us well out of relegation fears and strongly mid-table (a very Bath-esque turn around); and this year has seen us remain unbeaten since January this year. Ironically our last loss was against Clermont, (I didn’t play…*cough* *cough*) plus were in a European final to boot.Itll be even the more special if we manage to come away with some silverware at the end of the season, in both if my wishes permit, but either way as a club weve come full- circle, something Im proud to have been a part of.Hope to have you all behind us against Clermont in Saint Etienne on Saturday.Best regardsSkeato _______________________________________________________________________________ Follow Ross on Twitter @RossSkeate and be sure to visit his website RossSkeate.com regularly for some fantastic photos, latest news, and behind the scenes snippets of what goes on at Toulon. We’ll hear back from Ross soon.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHere’s What That Tiny Hole Next to Your Iphone Camera Actually DoesNueeyShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Hooker Jason Rutledge’s incredible tryline defence against Waikato

first_imgSunday Sep 26, 2010 Hooker Jason Rutledge’s incredible tryline defence against Waikato Southland retained the Ranfurley Shield with a famous 9-6 win over Auckland on Thursday night, beating them for only the 8th time in 51 attempts. Hooker Jason Rutledge has been inspirational this season, as he showed a week back against Waikato with some great defensive play close to the tryline.ADVERTISEMENTRutledge, the son of a Southland legend and All Black flank, has come a long way to reach 100 caps for his team. No longer a youngster, the burly hooker has inspired those around him to greatness, as they now sit firmly at the top of the table in the ITM Cup.Rutledge has impressed former All Blacks coach Laurie Mains, who has stated that he feels the gutsy hooker should be going on the end of year tour with New Zealand in a few months time.The 32 year old had a strong Super 14, but was overlooked by the All Black selectors. His recent performances have suggested that he was fairly unlucky.“I would be selecting Jason Rutledge and the reason is that the All Blacks have played a much more aggressive and physical game at the contact area this year and that has brought them great success,” Mains said.“Jason Rutledge absolutely fits into that mould. He is the best of the hookers in New Zealand in that close contact area whether it be offensive or turning over ball.“There is a chip of his great All Black father Leicester in the way he plays. He just loves the game so much and clearly he loves the fierce competition. The tougher it is seems to be the better he goes and we see that particularly in his pick and go, but in other areas of the game.ADVERTISEMENT“We are seeing him do things that we don’t expect front rowers to be pulling off,” he added.Usually we see flash moves from the backs featured here as short clips on RD, but this is one for the forwards as it features two superb try line tackles against Waikato last weekend, epitomising the way Rutledge plays the game. Definitely worth watching.Time: 02:46ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedWrinkle Remedy Stuns TV Judges: Forget Surgery, Do This Once DailySmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living90% of People Have No Idea What These Two Little Holes Are ForNueeyYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Rugby World Cup Daily – Tonga beat Japan

first_imgWednesday Sep 21, 2011 Rugby World Cup Daily – Tonga beat Japan Tonga and Japan provided another entertaining World Cup game earlier today as the Tongan fans finally got something to cheer about, as their side came away 31-18 winners in Whangarei. Flyhalf Kurt Morath kicked sixteen points for the Tongans as Japan suffered their 17th consecutive RWC loss. Coach John Kirwan had aspirations of picking up at least one win, and Tonga would have been a game they targeted for a win.Vili Ma’afu, Lua Lokotui, and Fetu’u Vainikolo all scored tries for the Tongans while Morath did the rest with the boot. Japan themselves scored three, but failed to land most of their kicks.In today’s Rugby World Cup daily there is a short recap of the game, but we also get to see what’s happening at the fanzone in Christchurch, where despite their being no matches, they’re still creating a tournament buzz.There’s also a look at why the smaller nations, often referred to as minnows, are now becoming more of a threat, as they are no longer serious whipping boys when it comes to the World Cup.You can view official highlights from the match here.What were your thoughts on the match, and do you see Tonga progressing further? ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Rugby World Cup Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO If you can get your head around it, these… 47 WEEKS AGO You’ve never seen any Rugby World Cup drop… 49 WEEKS AGO TOP 10: Rugby World Cup 2015 was filled with… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedDoctors Stunned: She Removes Her Wrinkles With This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

England power past Ireland at Twickenham

first_imgMonday Mar 19, 2012 England power past Ireland at Twickenham England finished second in the Six Nations championship following a powerful performance against Ireland at Twickenham. The English forwards dominated up front, resulting in a 30-9 victory against the Irish, on St Patrick’s Day. The home side were awarded a penalty try by referee Nigel Owens after the Irish pack disintegrated under the persistant pressure. A similar situation occured later in the game, resulting in just a penalty, but a quick tap from Ben Youngs. Owen Farrell kept up his good form by kicking six penalties and a conversion.Ireland coach Declan Kidney blamed the loss on their scrum weaknesses. “I wasn’t surprised by what happened at the scrum because Mike Ross got a crick on his neck at the first scrum and managed to play for half an hour after that,” he said.“Tom Court came on and went valiantly, but our balance was off. That was always on the cards because we have guys who don’t have huge tighthead experience playing for Ireland at the moment. It’s something we’ll have to work on and bring more Irish guys through.”Interim England coach Stuart Lancaster, who took over from Martin Johnson following the Rugby World Cup, looks to have secured his position as being in charge fulltime. His assistant, Graham Rowntree, has backed him fully, as have many of the players.“We’re reborn as a new team under Stuart. It’s hard to think about the World Cup because it’s such a long time ago. We’re still not the finished article and there’s loads more to come. I’ve never worked with such an energetic group of young players who just want to do well,” he said.It’s since been reported that Nick Mallett is still the frontrunner for the job though, with his international experience and credentials outweighing that of Lancaster’s. The RFU have said they won’t be swayed by public sentiment, and will reportedly interview both candidates this week.ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingShe Was the Most Beautiful Girl in the World. What She Looks Like Now is InsaneNueey10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueey30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

London Wasps players given sprinting masterclass by track stars

first_imgThursday Jul 18, 2013 London Wasps players given sprinting masterclass by track stars Speed will prove a crucial asset at this year’s J.P. Morgan Asset Management Premiership Rugby 7s Series – and London Wasps may have gained a competitive edge after picking up some sprinting tips from some of Great Britain’s fastest.Team GB track stars Adam Gemili, the newly crowned European Under-23 100m champion, and Jeanette Kwayke paid a visit to Wasps’ training ground to lead a sprinting master class.Tom Varndell, Charlie Hayter and Liam O’Neill were all put through their paces in the scorching heat and each received individual advice on their sprinting technique.Watching on keenly was scrum-half Joe Simpson, who opted out to rest up ahead of pre-season fitness tests, and the 25-year-old believes any piece of advice his team-mates can take into the J.P. Morgan Premiership Rugby 7s series could make all the difference between winning and losing.“We have been picking up a couple of tips ahead of the J.P. Morgan Premiership Rugby 7s and seeing how we can improve our speed, getting out of the blocks and getting that initial burst of speed,” said Simpson.“That is the difference between getting through a gap or not, making the cover tackles or missing them – that’s winning or losing right there.“Any improvement that we can get from different sports and athletics is one we share a lot of fundamental aspects with, any gain is perfect for us.”Gemili, who reached the 100m semi-finals at the London 2012 Olympic Games last summer, was impressed by the talent that was on show and believes he has imparted some wisdom that the squad can use to their advantage in the upcoming season.“I used to play a bit of rugby as a kid so I’ve loved coming here and sharing my sprint knowledge with the guys. Rugby 7s is such an exciting sport to watch and the sheer pace of some of the lads who play it is incredible,” he said.“Speed and power are big parts of their game so today Jeanette and I worked on a number of different elements that can help them with this.“There are a few of the guys here who wouldn’t look out of place lining up on the track but fingers crossed for my sake they stick with rugby.”The J.P Morgan Premiership Rugby 7s kicks off on 1st August at Kingsholm with rounds at Franklin’s Gardens and Allianz Park and the Final at The Recreation Ground. For tickets and more information visit:www.jpmorgan7s.com or follow @jpmorganrugby7sADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Sevens Related Articles 66 WEEKS AGO Part three of the award winning USA 7s documentary… 107 WEEKS AGO Table topping Fiji fly past Australia to… 114 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Touching jersey ceremony for young… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: This Removes Wrinkles Like Crazy! (Try Tonight)Smart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living30+ Everyday Items With A Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more